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BTEC Higher National Certificate in International Travel and Tourism Management (RQF)

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BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to provide specialist vocational programmes, linked to professional body requirements and National Occupational Standards. The qualifications provide a thorough grounding in the key concepts and practical skills required in their sector and their national recognition by employers allows progression direct into employment. BTEC Higher Nationals offer a strong emphasis on practical skills development alongside the development of requisite knowledge and understanding in their sector. Learners are attracted to this strong vocational programme of study that meets their individual progression needs whether this is into employment or to further study on degree or professional courses.
A key progression path for BTEC Higher National Certificate and Diploma learners is to the second or third year of a degree or honours degree programme, depending on the match of the BTEC Higher National units to the degree programme in question.
BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management have been developed to focus on:

  • providing education and training for a range of management careers in hospitality, licensed retail, food and beverage or leisure and tourism sectors; for example food and beverage manager, front of house manager or events manager
  • providing opportunities for hospitality managers to follow specialised areas of study directly relevant to individual vocations and professions within the hospitality industry, including study within the licensed trade, leisure and/or tourism sectors, or specialist culinary arts, leading to a nationally-recognised Level 5 vocationally-specific qualification
  • providing opportunities for full-time learners to gain a nationally-recognised vocationally specific qualification to enter employment in hospitality management or progress to higher-education, vocational qualifications such as a full-time degree in hospitality management or related areas such as business management or leisure and tourism management
  • developing the knowledge, understanding and skills of learners in the field of hospitality management in a range of fields, including those suggested above
  • providing opportunities for learners to focus on the development of higher-level skills in a hospitality management context, including investigatory and research skills focusing on management issues within the context of hospitality, leisure or tourism
  • providing opportunities for learners to develop a range of skills and techniques and attributes essential for successful performance in working life within the hospitality industry.

This qualification meets the needs of the above rationale by:

  • developing a range of knowledge and understanding, skills and techniques, personal qualities and attributes essential for successful performance in working life
  • developing the individual?s ability to make an immediate contribution to employment in the hospitality management industry, through effective use and combination of the knowledge and skills gained in different parts of the programme
  • providing opportunities for specialist study relevant to individual vocations and contexts
  • enabling progression to an undergraduate degree or further professional qualification in hospitality management or a related area
  • providing flexibility, knowledge, skills and motivation as a basis for future studies and career development in hospitality management.

Pearson Education is the UK’s largest awarding body offering academic and vocational qualifications that are globally recognised and benchmarked.  Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications are designated higher education qualifications in the UK. They are aligned to the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) Subject Benchmark Statements. These qualifications are part of the UK Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF).
BTECs are work-related qualifications for students taking their first steps into employment, or for those already in employment and seeking career development opportunities. BTECs provide progression into the workplace either directly or via study at university and are also designed to meet employer’s needs. Therefore, Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications are widely recognised by industry and higher education as the principal vocational qualification at Levels 4 and 5.

Who is this qualification for?
The BTEC Higher National qualifications in Hospitality Management are aimed at students wanting to continue their education through applied learning. Higher Nationals provide a wide-ranging study of the hospitality sector and are designed for students who wish to pursue or advance their career in hospitality. In addition to the knowledge, understanding and skills that underpin the study of hospitality, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management give students experience of the breadth and depth of the sector that will prepare them for further study or training.
Qualification codes
Ofqual Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) Qualification numbers:
Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Certificate in Hospitality Management: 603/2278/0

Career Benefits
The qualification prepares students for employment in the sector and is suitable for those who have already decided that they  wish to enter this area of work. Some students may wish to make the commitment required by this qualification in order to enter a specialist area of employment in the sector or progress into higher education.
Progression from this qualification may well be into or within employment in the sector where students may work towards professional membership or study for professional body examinations.
The BTEC Higher National Diploma offers a progression route to the second or third year of a degree or honours degree programme, depending on the match of the BTEC Higher National units to the degree programme in question.
Why choose Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals?
Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to help students secure the knowledge skills and behaviours needed to succeed in the workplace. They represent the latest in professional standards and provide opportunities for students to develop behaviours for work, for example by undertaking a group project, or responding to a client brief. A student may even achieve exemption from professional or vendor qualifications, or student membership of selected professional bodies, to help them on their journey to professional competence.
At the same time the BTEC Higher Nationals are intended to keep doors open for future study should a student wish to progress further in their education after their level 5 study. They do this by allowing space for the development of higher education study skills, such as the ability to research. Clear alignment of level of demand with the Framework for Higher Education qualification descriptors at level 4 and 5 means that students wishing to progress to level 6 study should feel better prepared.
Why choose Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals?
Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to help students secure the knowledge skills and behaviours needed to succeed in the workplace. They represent the latest in professional standards and provide opportunities for students to develop behaviours for work, for example by undertaking a group project, or responding to a client brief. A student may even achieve exemption from professional or vendor qualifications, or student membership of selected professional bodies, to help them on their journey to professional competence.
At the same time the BTEC Higher Nationals are intended to keep doors open for future study should a student wish to progress further in their education after their level 5 study. They do this by allowing space for the development of higher education study skills, such as the ability to research. Clear alignment of level of demand with the Framework for Higher Education qualification descriptors at level 4 and 5 means that students wishing to progress to level 6 study should feel better prepared.

Core Modules

  1. The Contemporary Travel and Tourism Industry
  2. Managing the Customer Experience
  3. Professional Identity and Practice
  4. The Travel and Tourism Business Toolkit
  5. Leadership and Management for Service Industries (Pearson-set)

 

Specialist Modules

  1. Managing Conference & Events
  2. Online Travel Management
  3. Marketing Essentials for Travel and Tourism

Use of Maths and English within the curriculum
Those working within the hospitality sector cannot just rely on their technical skills and must ensure they develop all relevant employability skills to increase employment opportunities. For example, they will be required to communicate appropriately with stakeholders throughout their career, so the ability to use maths and English in a professional context is an essential employability skill that must be developed at all levels of study.
Development of essential maths and English skills are embedded throughout these qualifications in accordance with industry requirements and below are some examples of how these skills are developed in the curriculum:

  • Written reports
  • Formal presentations
  • Informal conversations
  • Use of professional, sector specific language

How Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management provide both transferable employability skills and academic study skills
Students need both relevant qualifications and employability skills to enhance their career prospects and contribute to their personal development. Pearson Higher National Hospitality Management qualifications embed throughout the programme the development of key skills, attributes and strengths required by 21st century employers.
Employability skills referred here generally fall in five main categories:

  • Cognitive and problem-solving skills: critical thinking, approaching non- routine problems by applying expert and creative solutions, use of systems and digital technology, generating and communicating ideas creatively.
  • Intra-personal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self- monitoring and self-development, self-analysis and reflection, planning and prioritising.
  • Interpersonal skills: effective communication and articulation of information, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation.
  • Commercial skills: sector awareness; sales; marketing/promotion; budget management/monitoring.
  • Business skills: awareness of types of companies, company formation, invoicing, calculating fees, business management.

Students can also benefit from opportunities for deeper learning, where they are able to make connections between units and select areas of interest for detailed study. In this way BTEC Higher Nationals provide a vocational context in which students can develop the knowledge and academic study skills required for progression to university degree courses, including:

  • Active research skills
  • Effective writing skills
  • Analytical skills
  • Critical thinking
  • Creative problem-solving
  • Decision-making
  • Team building
  • Exam preparation skills
  • Digital literacy
  • Competence in assessment methods used in higher education.

To support you in developing these skills in your students, we have developed a map of Higher Education relevant transferable and academic study skills, available in appendices.
Planning your programme
Delivering the Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management

For students who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following:

  • A BTEC Level 3 qualification in Hospitality
  • A GCE Advanced Level profile that demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades A* to C (or equivalent), and/or 9 to 4 (or equivalent) in subjects such as maths and English
  • Other related Level 3 qualifications
  • An Access to Higher Education Diploma awarded by an approved further education institution
  • Related work experience
  • An international equivalent of the above.

We consider applicants’ prior learning when considering your acceptance on a BTEC Higher Nationals, through Recognition of Prior Learning.
English language requirements
Pearson’s mission is to help people make more of their lives through learning. In order for students to be successful on Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications which are both taught and assessed in English, it is critical that they have an appropriate level of English language skills.
The following clarifies the requirements for all Centres when recruiting applicants on to new Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications.
All Centres delivering the new Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications must ensure that all students who are non-native English speakers and who have not undertaken their final two years of schooling in English, can demonstrate capability in English at a standard equivalent to the levels identified below, before being recruited to the programme where the programme is both taught and assessed in English:

  • Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) level B2
  • PTE 51
  • IELTS 5.5; Reading and Writing must be at 5.5
  • or equivalent.

It is up to the Centre to decide what proof will be necessary to evidence individual student proficiency.
The following clarifies the requirements for all Centres when recruiting applicants on to new Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications which are taught in a language other than English, but are assessed in English.
All Centres delivering the new Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications wholly or partially in a language other than English, but who are assessed in English, must ensure that all students can demonstrate capability in English at a standard equivalent to the levels identified below, on completion of the programme:

  • Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) level B2
  • PTE 51
  • IELTS 5.5; Reading and Writing must be at 5.5
  • or equivalent.

It is up to the Centre to decide what proof will be necessary to evidence individual student proficiency.

Start Dates

TO BE CONFIRMED

Tuition Fee

Full Time: £6000.00

Duration

Full Time / 1 Year

Awarding Body

Subject to approval by Pearson, Centres are free to deliver BTEC Higher Nationals using modes of delivery that meet the needs of their students. We recommend making use of a wide variety of modes, including:

  • Full-time
  • Part-time
  • Blended learning

On successful completion of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma, students can develop their careers in the hospitality sector through:

  • Entering employment
  • Continuing existing employment
  • Linking with the appropriate Professional Body
  • Linking with the appropriate industry certificates
  • Committing to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • Progressing to university.

The Level 5 Higher National Diploma is recognised by Higher Education providers as meeting admission requirements to many relevant hospitality-related courses, for example:

  • BSc (Hons) in Hospitality and Events Management
  • BA and BSc (Hons) in Culinary Arts Management
  • BSc (Hons) in International Hospitality Management

Students should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific Higher Education providers.  Students can also progress directly into employment.

The skills offered as part of the Pearson BTEC Higher National Diploma can provide graduates with the opportunity to work in many different areas of hospitality. Below are some examples of job roles each qualification could lead to.

 

Pathway

 

Job Roles

 

Culinary Arts Management

 

●       Senior Chef

●       Head Chef

●       Sous Chef

●       Kitchen Manager

 

Food and Beverage

 

●       Bar/Pub Manager

●       Coffee Shop Manager

●       Restaurant Manager

●       Food and Beverage Manager

●       Site Manager

 

Accommodation and Revenue Management

 

●       Front Office Manager

●       Hotel Manager

●       Resort Manager

●       Hotel Operations Manager

●       Revenue and Sales Manager

●       Reservations Manager

●       Head of Housekeeping

 

Events

 

●       Events Manager

●       Special Events Manager

●       Conference and Banqueting Manager

●       Events Project Manager

 

Innovative Marketing and Sales

 

●       Marketing Manager

●       Product and Sales Manager

●       Sales and Marketing Manager

●       Assistant Product Manager

●       Sales Development Manager

 

General/All Pathways

 

●       Assistant General Manager

●       Duty Manager

●       Assistant Hospitality Manager

●       Hospitality Customer Relationships Manager

Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications in Hospitality Management offer:

  • A stimulating and challenging programme of study that will be both engaging and memorable for students.
  • The essential subject knowledge that students need to progress successfully into further study or the world of work.
  • A simplified structure: students undertake a substantial core of learning in the Higher National Certificate and can build on this in the Higher National Diploma, with optional units linked to their specialist area of study.
  • Five specialist pathways in the Level 5 Diploma, so there is something to suit each student’s preference of study and future progression plans.
  • Refreshed content that is closely aligned with Professional Body, employer and higher education needs.
  • Assessments that consider cognitive skills (what students know) along with affective and applied skills (respectively how they behave and what they can do).
  • Unit-specific grading and Pearson-set assignments.
  • A varied approach to assessment that supports progression to Level 6 and also allows Centres to offer assessment relevant to the local economy, thereby accommodating and enhancing different learning styles.
  • Quality Assurance measures – as outlined in sections 6 and 7 of this Programme Specification – to ensure that all stakeholders (e.g. professional bodies, universities, colleges and students) can feel confident in the integrity and value of the qualifications.
  • A qualification designed to meet the needs and expectations of students aspiring to work in an international hospitality environment.

Students completing their BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management will be aiming to go on to employment or progress to a final year at university.

2.1         Purpose of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management

The purpose of BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals able to meet the demands of employers in Hospitality Management and adapt to a constantly changing world. The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them.

2.2         Objectives of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management

The objectives of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management are as follows:

  • To provide an exciting, stimulating and challenging programme of study in Hospitality that combines subject knowledge and industry experience that is both responsive to the constantly evolving needs of students and employers.
  • To equip students with hospitality skills, knowledge and the understanding necessary to achieve high performance in the global hospitality environment.
  • To enrich the student experience through a diverse and innovative programme of study that stems from a vocational and technical perspective.
  • To empower students through the study of core themes in management, leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship to maximise employability.
  • To provide education and training for a range of careers in hospitality, including food and beverage management, hotel management, kitchen management, facilities management and events management.
  • To provide insight and understanding into the diversity of roles within the hospitality industry, recognising the importance of networking and collaboration at all levels.
  • To equip students with knowledge and understanding of culturally diverse organisations, cross-cultural issues, diversity and values.
  • To provide opportunities for students to enter or progress in employment in hospitality, or progress to higher education qualifications such as an Honours degree in hospitality or a related area.
  • To provide opportunities for students to develop the skills, techniques and personal attributes essential for successful working lives.
  • To support students to understand the local, regional and global context of the hospitality sector and support those students with a global outlook, to aspire to international career pathways.
  • To provide students with opportunities to address contemporary issues facing the industry, and society at large; with particular emphasis on sustainability and the environment, globalisation and the impact of digital technology.
  • To provide opportunities for students to achieve a nationally-recognised professional qualification within their chosen area of specialisation.
  • To offer students the chance of career progression in their chosen field, with particular emphasis on achieving management-level positions, professional recognition and beyond.
  • To allow flexibility of study and to meet local or specialist needs.
  • To offer a balance between employability skills and the knowledge essential for students with entrepreneurial, employment or academic aspirations.
  • To provide students with opportunities to engage in an industry-recognised apprenticeship scheme for Hospitality Manager that aligns with their employer’s needs and their own career aspirations.
  • To provide students with the context in which to consider professional ethics and their relation to personal, professional and statutory responsibilities within the industry.

We meet these objectives by:

  • Providing a thorough grounding in hospitality principles at Level 4 that leads the student to a range of specialist progression pathways at Level 5 relating to individual professions within hospitality.
  • Equipping individuals with commercial acumen, understanding and hospitality skills for success in a diverse range of roles in food and beverage, accommodation, events and contract catering services in hospitality.
  • Enabling progression to a university degree by supporting the development of appropriate academic study skills required to apply and evaluate theories and concepts in core areas of hospitality.
  • Enabling progression to further professional qualifications in specific hospitality areas by mapping to units in a range of professional hospitality qualifications.

All units are usually 15 credits in value, or a multiple thereof. These units have been designed from a learning time perspective, and are expressed in terms of Total Qualification Time (TQT).  TQT is an estimate of the total amount of time that could reasonably be expected to be required for a student to achieve and demonstrate the achievement of the level of attainment necessary for the award of a qualification.  TQT includes undertaking each of the activities of Guided Learning, Directed Learning and Invigilated Assessment. Each 15-credit unit approximates to a Total Unit Time of 150 hours with 60 hours of Guided Learning.
Total Qualification Time (TQT) Higher National Diploma (HND) = 2,400 hours
Examples of activities which can contribute to Total Qualification Time include:

  • Guided Learning
  • Independent and unsupervised research/learning
  • Unsupervised compilation of a portfolio of work experience
  • Unsupervised e-learning
  • Unsupervised e-assessment
  • Unsupervised coursework
  • Watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar
  • Unsupervised work-based learning.

Guided Learning (GL) is defined as the time when a tutor is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning Centres and learning workshops. Guided Learning includes any supervised assessment activity; this includes invigilated examination and observed assessment and observed work-based practice.
Total Guided Learning (GL) Higher National Certificate (HNC) = 480 hours
Total Guided Learning (GL) Higher National Diploma (HND) = 960 hours Some examples of activities which can contribute to Guided Learning include:

  • Classroom-based learning supervised by a tutor
  • Work-based learning supervised by a tutor
  • Live webinar or telephone tutorial with a tutor in real time
  • E-learning supervised by a tutor in real time
  • All forms of assessment which take place under the immediate guidance or supervision of a tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training, including where the assessment is competence-based and may be turned into a learning opportunity.

Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in International Travel and Tourism Management

  • Qualification credit value: a minimum of 120 credits. This is made up of eight units, each with a value of 15 credits.
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) Higher National Certificate (HNC) = 1,200 hours
  • Total Guided Learning (GL) Higher National Certificate (HNC) = 480 hours
  • There is a required mix of Core, Specialist and Optional units totalling 120 credits. All units are at Level 4.

Engaging with employers
Just as the student voice is important, so too is the employer’s. Employers play a significant role in the design and development of all regulated qualifications, including the Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management. This input should extend into the learning experience, where engagement with employers will add value to students, particularly in transferring theory into practice
Planning and structuring a programme
Aim at the College is to make Learning challenging yet exciting; teaching should be motivating and inspirational. Consequently, both teaching and learning should form part of a programme structure that is active, flexible and progressive, and has an industry focus wherever possible.
Condensed and expanded delivery
The College considers delivery in a condensed, expanded or mixed programme.  The condensed version would provide an opportunity for students to gain early success and achievement. This will enhance their self-efficacy, the sense of one’s belief in one’s ability to succeed, and self-confidence, with tutors being able to identify and respond to less able students early in the teaching and learning cycle.  The advantages of the expanded version include providing a longer timescale for students to absorb new knowledge and therefore, potentially, improve success, and giving tutors an opportunity to coach and support less able students over a longer period of time.  The mixed version, with some units spanning over the entire period and others lasting for shorter periods, provides opportunities for learning in some units to support development in others. The College delivers the first teaching block using the expanded version, with the subsequent teaching block being delivered through a condensed approach.

Delivery Techniques Used

The centre uses a combination of following delivery techniques:

Technique Face-to-face Distance learning
Lectures and seminars These are the most common techniques used by tutors. They offer an opportunity to engage with a large number of students, where the focus is on sharing knowledge through the use of presentations. Delivery would be through video conferencing and/or pre-recorded audio and/or visual material, available through an online platform. Synchronous discussion forums could also be used.
Workshops These are used to build on knowledge shared via tutors and seminars. Teaching can be more in-depth where knowledge is applied, for example to case studies or real-life examples.

Workshops could be student-led, where students present, for example, findings from independent study.

While more challenging to organise than for face-to-face delivery, workshops should not be dismissed. Smaller groups of three or four students could access a forum simultaneously and engage in the same type of activity as for face-to-face.
Tutorials These present an opportunity for focused one-to-one support, where teaching is led by an individual student’s requirements. These can be most effective in the run up to assessment, where tutors can provide more focused direction, perhaps based on a formative assessment. Other than not necessarily being in the same room as a student, tutors could still provide effective tutorials.

Video conferencing tools provide the means to see a student, which makes any conversation more personal.

Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) These are invaluable to students studying on a face-to-face programme. Used effectively, VLEs not only provide a repository for taught material such as presentation slides or handouts, but could be used to set formative tasks such as quizzes. Further reading could also be located on a VLE, along with a copy of the programme documents, such as the handbook and assessment timetable. A VLE is a must if students are engaged with online delivery through distance or blended learning, as this would be the primary or the key source of learning.

Where distance learning is primarily delivered through hard copies of workbooks, etc., the same principle would apply as for face-to- face learning.

 

 

Technique Face-to-face Distance learning
Blended learning The combination of traditional face-to-face learning and online learning. This can enable the students to gain personalised support, instruction and guidance while completing assigned activities and tasks remotely. Offline learning enables students to develop autonomy and self-discipline by completing set activities and tasks with limited direction and traditional classroom-based constraints.
Work-based learning Any opportunity to integrate work-based learning into a curriculum should be taken. This adds realism and provides students with an opportunity to link theory to practice in a way in which case studies do not. Many full-time students are involved in some form of employment, either paid or voluntary, which could be used, where appropriate, as part of their learning, for example when assignments require students to contextualise a response to a real organisation. It is likely that the majority of distance learning students would be employed and possibly classed as mature students. Bringing theory to life through a curriculum, which requires work-based application of knowledge, would make learning for these students more relevant and meaningful. Perhaps more importantly, assessment should be grounded in a student’s place of work, wherever possible.
Guest speakers These could be experts from industry or visiting academics in the subject area that is being studied. They could be used to present a lecture/seminar, a workshop or to contribute to assessment. The objective is to make the most effective use of an expert’s knowledge and skill by adding value to the teaching and learning experience. As long as the expert has access to the same platform as the students then the value-added contribution would still be very high.

Consideration would need to be given to timings and logistics, but with some innovative management this technique would still have a place in distance learning programmes.

Field trips Effectively planned field trips, which have a direct relevance to the syllabus, would add value to the learning experience. Through these trips students could relate theory to practice, have an opportunity to experience organisations in action, and potentially open their minds to career routes. The use of field trips could be included as part of a distance learning programme. They will add the same value and require the same planning.

One additional benefit of field trips for distance learning is that they provide an opportunity for all students in a cohort to meet, which is a rare occurrence for distance learning students.

+ Mode of Delivery

Subject to approval by Pearson, Centres are free to deliver BTEC Higher Nationals using modes of delivery that meet the needs of their students. We recommend making use of a wide variety of modes, including:

  • Full-time
  • Part-time
  • Blended learning
+ Leads To

On successful completion of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma, students can develop their careers in the hospitality sector through:

  • Entering employment
  • Continuing existing employment
  • Linking with the appropriate Professional Body
  • Linking with the appropriate industry certificates
  • Committing to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • Progressing to university.

The Level 5 Higher National Diploma is recognised by Higher Education providers as meeting admission requirements to many relevant hospitality-related courses, for example:

  • BSc (Hons) in Hospitality and Events Management
  • BA and BSc (Hons) in Culinary Arts Management
  • BSc (Hons) in International Hospitality Management

Students should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific Higher Education providers.  Students can also progress directly into employment.

The skills offered as part of the Pearson BTEC Higher National Diploma can provide graduates with the opportunity to work in many different areas of hospitality. Below are some examples of job roles each qualification could lead to.

 

Pathway

 

Job Roles

 

Culinary Arts Management

 

●       Senior Chef

●       Head Chef

●       Sous Chef

●       Kitchen Manager

 

Food and Beverage

 

●       Bar/Pub Manager

●       Coffee Shop Manager

●       Restaurant Manager

●       Food and Beverage Manager

●       Site Manager

 

Accommodation and Revenue Management

 

●       Front Office Manager

●       Hotel Manager

●       Resort Manager

●       Hotel Operations Manager

●       Revenue and Sales Manager

●       Reservations Manager

●       Head of Housekeeping

 

Events

 

●       Events Manager

●       Special Events Manager

●       Conference and Banqueting Manager

●       Events Project Manager

 

Innovative Marketing and Sales

 

●       Marketing Manager

●       Product and Sales Manager

●       Sales and Marketing Manager

●       Assistant Product Manager

●       Sales Development Manager

 

General/All Pathways

 

●       Assistant General Manager

●       Duty Manager

●       Assistant Hospitality Manager

●       Hospitality Customer Relationships Manager

+ Key Features

Pearson BTEC Higher National qualifications in Hospitality Management offer:

  • A stimulating and challenging programme of study that will be both engaging and memorable for students.
  • The essential subject knowledge that students need to progress successfully into further study or the world of work.
  • A simplified structure: students undertake a substantial core of learning in the Higher National Certificate and can build on this in the Higher National Diploma, with optional units linked to their specialist area of study.
  • Five specialist pathways in the Level 5 Diploma, so there is something to suit each student’s preference of study and future progression plans.
  • Refreshed content that is closely aligned with Professional Body, employer and higher education needs.
  • Assessments that consider cognitive skills (what students know) along with affective and applied skills (respectively how they behave and what they can do).
  • Unit-specific grading and Pearson-set assignments.
  • A varied approach to assessment that supports progression to Level 6 and also allows Centres to offer assessment relevant to the local economy, thereby accommodating and enhancing different learning styles.
  • Quality Assurance measures – as outlined in sections 6 and 7 of this Programme Specification – to ensure that all stakeholders (e.g. professional bodies, universities, colleges and students) can feel confident in the integrity and value of the qualifications.
  • A qualification designed to meet the needs and expectations of students aspiring to work in an international hospitality environment.

Students completing their BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management will be aiming to go on to employment or progress to a final year at university.

2.1         Purpose of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management

The purpose of BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals able to meet the demands of employers in Hospitality Management and adapt to a constantly changing world. The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them.

2.2         Objectives of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management

The objectives of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management are as follows:

  • To provide an exciting, stimulating and challenging programme of study in Hospitality that combines subject knowledge and industry experience that is both responsive to the constantly evolving needs of students and employers.
  • To equip students with hospitality skills, knowledge and the understanding necessary to achieve high performance in the global hospitality environment.
  • To enrich the student experience through a diverse and innovative programme of study that stems from a vocational and technical perspective.
  • To empower students through the study of core themes in management, leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship to maximise employability.
  • To provide education and training for a range of careers in hospitality, including food and beverage management, hotel management, kitchen management, facilities management and events management.
  • To provide insight and understanding into the diversity of roles within the hospitality industry, recognising the importance of networking and collaboration at all levels.
  • To equip students with knowledge and understanding of culturally diverse organisations, cross-cultural issues, diversity and values.
  • To provide opportunities for students to enter or progress in employment in hospitality, or progress to higher education qualifications such as an Honours degree in hospitality or a related area.
  • To provide opportunities for students to develop the skills, techniques and personal attributes essential for successful working lives.
  • To support students to understand the local, regional and global context of the hospitality sector and support those students with a global outlook, to aspire to international career pathways.
  • To provide students with opportunities to address contemporary issues facing the industry, and society at large; with particular emphasis on sustainability and the environment, globalisation and the impact of digital technology.
  • To provide opportunities for students to achieve a nationally-recognised professional qualification within their chosen area of specialisation.
  • To offer students the chance of career progression in their chosen field, with particular emphasis on achieving management-level positions, professional recognition and beyond.
  • To allow flexibility of study and to meet local or specialist needs.
  • To offer a balance between employability skills and the knowledge essential for students with entrepreneurial, employment or academic aspirations.
  • To provide students with opportunities to engage in an industry-recognised apprenticeship scheme for Hospitality Manager that aligns with their employer’s needs and their own career aspirations.
  • To provide students with the context in which to consider professional ethics and their relation to personal, professional and statutory responsibilities within the industry.

We meet these objectives by:

  • Providing a thorough grounding in hospitality principles at Level 4 that leads the student to a range of specialist progression pathways at Level 5 relating to individual professions within hospitality.
  • Equipping individuals with commercial acumen, understanding and hospitality skills for success in a diverse range of roles in food and beverage, accommodation, events and contract catering services in hospitality.
  • Enabling progression to a university degree by supporting the development of appropriate academic study skills required to apply and evaluate theories and concepts in core areas of hospitality.
  • Enabling progression to further professional qualifications in specific hospitality areas by mapping to units in a range of professional hospitality qualifications.
+ Qualification Time

All units are usually 15 credits in value, or a multiple thereof. These units have been designed from a learning time perspective, and are expressed in terms of Total Qualification Time (TQT).  TQT is an estimate of the total amount of time that could reasonably be expected to be required for a student to achieve and demonstrate the achievement of the level of attainment necessary for the award of a qualification.  TQT includes undertaking each of the activities of Guided Learning, Directed Learning and Invigilated Assessment. Each 15-credit unit approximates to a Total Unit Time of 150 hours with 60 hours of Guided Learning.
Total Qualification Time (TQT) Higher National Diploma (HND) = 2,400 hours
Examples of activities which can contribute to Total Qualification Time include:

  • Guided Learning
  • Independent and unsupervised research/learning
  • Unsupervised compilation of a portfolio of work experience
  • Unsupervised e-learning
  • Unsupervised e-assessment
  • Unsupervised coursework
  • Watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar
  • Unsupervised work-based learning.

Guided Learning (GL) is defined as the time when a tutor is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning Centres and learning workshops. Guided Learning includes any supervised assessment activity; this includes invigilated examination and observed assessment and observed work-based practice.
Total Guided Learning (GL) Higher National Certificate (HNC) = 480 hours
Total Guided Learning (GL) Higher National Diploma (HND) = 960 hours Some examples of activities which can contribute to Guided Learning include:

  • Classroom-based learning supervised by a tutor
  • Work-based learning supervised by a tutor
  • Live webinar or telephone tutorial with a tutor in real time
  • E-learning supervised by a tutor in real time
  • All forms of assessment which take place under the immediate guidance or supervision of a tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training, including where the assessment is competence-based and may be turned into a learning opportunity.
+ Structure

Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in International Travel and Tourism Management

  • Qualification credit value: a minimum of 120 credits. This is made up of eight units, each with a value of 15 credits.
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) Higher National Certificate (HNC) = 1,200 hours
  • Total Guided Learning (GL) Higher National Certificate (HNC) = 480 hours
  • There is a required mix of Core, Specialist and Optional units totalling 120 credits. All units are at Level 4.

Engaging with employers
Just as the student voice is important, so too is the employer’s. Employers play a significant role in the design and development of all regulated qualifications, including the Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management. This input should extend into the learning experience, where engagement with employers will add value to students, particularly in transferring theory into practice
Planning and structuring a programme
Aim at the College is to make Learning challenging yet exciting; teaching should be motivating and inspirational. Consequently, both teaching and learning should form part of a programme structure that is active, flexible and progressive, and has an industry focus wherever possible.
Condensed and expanded delivery
The College considers delivery in a condensed, expanded or mixed programme.  The condensed version would provide an opportunity for students to gain early success and achievement. This will enhance their self-efficacy, the sense of one’s belief in one’s ability to succeed, and self-confidence, with tutors being able to identify and respond to less able students early in the teaching and learning cycle.  The advantages of the expanded version include providing a longer timescale for students to absorb new knowledge and therefore, potentially, improve success, and giving tutors an opportunity to coach and support less able students over a longer period of time.  The mixed version, with some units spanning over the entire period and others lasting for shorter periods, provides opportunities for learning in some units to support development in others. The College delivers the first teaching block using the expanded version, with the subsequent teaching block being delivered through a condensed approach.

+ Delivery

Delivery Techniques Used

The centre uses a combination of following delivery techniques:

Technique Face-to-face Distance learning
Lectures and seminars These are the most common techniques used by tutors. They offer an opportunity to engage with a large number of students, where the focus is on sharing knowledge through the use of presentations. Delivery would be through video conferencing and/or pre-recorded audio and/or visual material, available through an online platform. Synchronous discussion forums could also be used.
Workshops These are used to build on knowledge shared via tutors and seminars. Teaching can be more in-depth where knowledge is applied, for example to case studies or real-life examples.

Workshops could be student-led, where students present, for example, findings from independent study.

While more challenging to organise than for face-to-face delivery, workshops should not be dismissed. Smaller groups of three or four students could access a forum simultaneously and engage in the same type of activity as for face-to-face.
Tutorials These present an opportunity for focused one-to-one support, where teaching is led by an individual student’s requirements. These can be most effective in the run up to assessment, where tutors can provide more focused direction, perhaps based on a formative assessment. Other than not necessarily being in the same room as a student, tutors could still provide effective tutorials.

Video conferencing tools provide the means to see a student, which makes any conversation more personal.

Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) These are invaluable to students studying on a face-to-face programme. Used effectively, VLEs not only provide a repository for taught material such as presentation slides or handouts, but could be used to set formative tasks such as quizzes. Further reading could also be located on a VLE, along with a copy of the programme documents, such as the handbook and assessment timetable. A VLE is a must if students are engaged with online delivery through distance or blended learning, as this would be the primary or the key source of learning.

Where distance learning is primarily delivered through hard copies of workbooks, etc., the same principle would apply as for face-to- face learning.

 

 

Technique Face-to-face Distance learning
Blended learning The combination of traditional face-to-face learning and online learning. This can enable the students to gain personalised support, instruction and guidance while completing assigned activities and tasks remotely. Offline learning enables students to develop autonomy and self-discipline by completing set activities and tasks with limited direction and traditional classroom-based constraints.
Work-based learning Any opportunity to integrate work-based learning into a curriculum should be taken. This adds realism and provides students with an opportunity to link theory to practice in a way in which case studies do not. Many full-time students are involved in some form of employment, either paid or voluntary, which could be used, where appropriate, as part of their learning, for example when assignments require students to contextualise a response to a real organisation. It is likely that the majority of distance learning students would be employed and possibly classed as mature students. Bringing theory to life through a curriculum, which requires work-based application of knowledge, would make learning for these students more relevant and meaningful. Perhaps more importantly, assessment should be grounded in a student’s place of work, wherever possible.
Guest speakers These could be experts from industry or visiting academics in the subject area that is being studied. They could be used to present a lecture/seminar, a workshop or to contribute to assessment. The objective is to make the most effective use of an expert’s knowledge and skill by adding value to the teaching and learning experience. As long as the expert has access to the same platform as the students then the value-added contribution would still be very high.

Consideration would need to be given to timings and logistics, but with some innovative management this technique would still have a place in distance learning programmes.

Field trips Effectively planned field trips, which have a direct relevance to the syllabus, would add value to the learning experience. Through these trips students could relate theory to practice, have an opportunity to experience organisations in action, and potentially open their minds to career routes. The use of field trips could be included as part of a distance learning programme. They will add the same value and require the same planning.

One additional benefit of field trips for distance learning is that they provide an opportunity for all students in a cohort to meet, which is a rare occurrence for distance learning students.

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